Category Archives: Featured Posts

Transcending Territory

Last week, Laura, Ivana and I went to The Museum of Arts and Design to see their latest exhibit: New Territories: Laboratories for Design, Craft and Art in Latin America. We are all taking the same participatory curatorial design course with Professor Nitin Sawhney titled, “Co-Lab: Curatorial Design and Media Practices: Guatemala Después,” which is a weekly studio that explores the culture of curatorial practice with a particular focus on the subversive contemporary art scene in Guatemala. The focal point of the Co-Lab revolves around the Guatemala Despues project which critically reflects upon the political, economic and cultural influences between the U.S. and Guatemala through the multi-disciplinary lens of creative practitioners from both locations. 
 
New Territories is a deftly designed exhibit that examines how the state of creating in today’s globalized society has inspired a convergence of art, design and craft, within several distinctive cities throughout Latin America, where some of the most influential directions in design are developing. It is a dynamic and thought-provoking exhibition and all of the pieces speak to various issues that are manifesting themselves in compelling ways within most parts of the region, from commodification and production, to urbanization, collective memory and sustainability. It’s an incredibly thoughtfully laid out display that also artfully blends craft, tradition, and new technological innovations. The exhibit’s strength lies in its subtle ability to transcend regionalism and national identity. New Territories will be at MAD until April 5th and is well worth a visit; its an ideal space to feel good lost. 
 
 
Additional information about Guatemala Despues and its joint exhbitions and public programming can be found at the following link: 
 
 
(New York City (Sheila Johnson Design Center) from April 9-29, 2015 & Ciudad de la Imaginación in Quetzaltenango in June 2015)

Exhibit at Museo del Barrio: Playing With Fire

About Exhibit 
Comedy refers to any discourse intended to amuse. The Greeks describe it as a dramatic performance which pits two groups or societies against each other in an amusing conflict. This is particularly true with political satire which portrays persons or institutions as corrupt with a sense of humor. This was the general approach with the exhibition Playing with Fire, currently showing at El Museo del Barrio.
Nicolas Dumit Estevez, the curator, takes a very whimsical, in your face, paradoxical approach to very tough subject matter; that of decaying and oppressive systems. By pushing the societal envelope, Estevez, in collaboration with noted activist artists, politicizes art space with a smile.
With regard to documenting the exhibit, I wanted the photos to show the communication between art, space and the viewer.
PARTICIPATING ARTISTS: ADAL, Manuel Acevedo, Maris Bustamante, Nao Bustamante, Papo Colo, Abigail DeVille, Alejandro Diaz, Adonis Flores, Ester Hernández, Javier Hinojosa (b. 1956, México, D.F.) with the collaboration of Melquiades Herrera (Mexico, D.F., 1949-2003), Jessica Kairé, Carlos Jesus Martinez Dominguez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Carlos Ortíz, Pedro Pietri, Jesús Natalio Puras Penzo (APECO), Quintín Rivera Toro, Juan Sánchez.
About the Curator: Nicolas Dumit Estevez
Source: Independent Curators International

New Territories

Specters of Communism: Contemporary Russian Art

Exhibition
Feb 6, 2015, 6:00 pm to Mar 28, 2015, 8:00 pm
The James Gallery

– See more at: http://centerforthehumanities.org/exhibition/specters-communism-contemporary-russian-art#sthash.xxecduMO.dpuf

Curated by Boris Groys, Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies, New York University.

Join us for the opening reception on Friday, February 6, 6-8pm.

In contemporary Russia, where official political and cultural attitudes have become increasingly conservative, a new generation of Russian artists continue the critical tradition of the Russian Left and utopianism of the Russian avant-garde. Taking up this desire to change reality by means of art, they explore ideals of equality and social justice, radical politics, secularism and internationalism, without forgetting the long history of post-revolutionary violence. Guest curated by Boris Groys and held at both the James Gallery and e-flux exhibition space downtown, this exhibition includes the works of artists from Moscow, St. Petersburg, and New York.

This exhibition is organized in collaboration with e-flux, where art by Anton Ginzburg, Pussy Riot, and Arseny Zhilyaev is on view.

Opening at e-flux: Tue, Feb 10, 6-8pm
8pm: Anton Vidokle, The Communist Revolution Was Caused By The Sun

e-flux location of the exhibition on view: Wed, Feb 11 – Sat, Mar 28
311 East Broadway

PLAYING WITH FIRE: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions

PLAYING WITH FIRE: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions

September 6, 2014 – February 7, 2015


Tracing the founding of El Museo del Barrio by Raphael Montañez Ortíz at the end of the 60s, an era of social unrest and radical activism in the United States as well as throughout the Americas, the works in this exhibition target colonialism, imperialism, urban neglect, and cultural hegemony with a vast array of weapons, including irreverence and humor. The artists confront the status quo with a wide range of disarming conceptual strategies and aesthetic detonators. The fire that surfaces in some of the artworks points to an equally dangerous and alluring element that consumes and transforms, one that must be handled with care.

Playing with Fire: Political Interventions, Dissident Acts, and Mischievous Actions purposely welcomes impolite, undomesticated, rebellious, hilarious, and even sacrilegious discourses and gestures that stick out their tongues at oppressive systems and push for the re-politicization of society and the art space.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS: ADAL, Manuel Acevedo, Maris Bustamante, Nao Bustamante, Papo Colo, Abigail DeVille, Alejandro Diaz, Adonis Flores, Ester Hernández, Javier Hinojosa (b. 1956, México, D.F.) with the collaboration of Melquiades Herrera (Mexico, D.F., 1949-2003), Jessica Kairé, Carlos Jesus Martinez Dominguez, Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga, Carlos Ortíz, Pedro Pietri, Jesús Natalio Puras Penzo (APECO), Quintín Rivera Toro, Juan Sánchez.

The exhibition, as part of El Museo’s Carmen Ana Unanue gallery is guest curated by multi-disciplinary artist Nicolás Dumit Estévez.

Black Banana: Exhibitions of Absence

 

Black Banana: Exhibitions of Absence – the paper

by Novel ‘Idea’ Sholars  and  Maira Nolasco                          

PDF:blackbananaExhibitionsofAbsencepaperdraft2

Introduction

Black Banana is the examination of structural racism in art curation and it’s effects on descendants of Africa living in Latin America. Acting as a metaphor, it sheds light on the absence of those of the African Diaspora in the workforce, and as a part of the overall Latin American cultural project. What are the histories of these erasures, and how does this history prove the existence of a racist hegemony that results in cultural exclusion? When did the whitening of Latin America begin and how does this whitening affect the economy of the black populations as well as their integration into Latin American society? Is the lack of Black Latino representation proof of racist curatorial practices in the Latin American contemporary art world? These are the questions this project hopes to explore. The Black Banana focus is to create awareness around the possible denial of racism and how that denial effects who and what is curated. Ultimately the goal is to provoke an open dialog about identity, hybridity, and access. Continue reading Black Banana: Exhibitions of Absence

FINAL – Black Banana: Exhibitions of Absence – the paper

Introduction

  Black Banana is a brief examination of structural racism in art curation and it’s effects on descendants of Africa living in Latin America. Acting as a metaphor, it sheds light on the absence of those of the African Diaspora in the workforce, and as a part of the overall Latin American cultural project. What are the histories of these erasures, and how does this history prove the existence of a racist hegemony that results in cultural exclusion? When did the whitening of Latin America begin and how does this whitening affect the economy of the black populations as well as their integration into Latin American society? Ultimately, is the lack of Black Latino representation proof of racist curatorial practices in the Latin American contemporary art world? The Black Banana focus is to create awareness around the possible denial of racism and how that denial effects who and what is curated. Ultimately the goal is to provoke an open dialog about identity, hybridity, and access. 

PDF below

blackbananaexhibitionsofabsencethepaperbynovelsholars

THE MURALS IN GUATEMALA AS MEMORY AND RESISTANCE

Memory initiatives have served several purposes: to recover the memory of what happened and make public denunciations, dignity and honor the memory of the victims, promote community organization and social reconstruction, inform and educate new generations, and to demand redress and justice. This paper focus on Guatemalan murals as a memory initiative and as an art form used by the direct victims of the conflict.

NEWSCHOOL_DVALERO_MURALS GUATEMALA